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Intercepted emails scams - Payment requests

  • How do intercepted email scams work?


    The aim of this type of scam (also known as push payment fraud) is to get you to voluntarily send, or authorise a payment to the scammer who has sent the email. Often, they will intercept or hack your email or another account involved in a transaction such as buying a house, paying for building work or booking a holiday – so it’s important to be extra vigilant at these times and double check emails from solicitors, builders or travel agents.

    The aim of this type of scam (also known as push payment fraud) is to get you to voluntarily send, or authorise a payment to the scammer who has sent the email. Often, they will intercept or hack your email or another account involved in a transaction such as buying a house, paying for building work or booking a holiday – so it’s important to be extra vigilant at these times and double check emails from solicitors, builders or travel agents.

Total losses due to authorised push payment (APP) scams were £145.4m in the first half of 2018*

  • How to spot the signs


    • you are asked to send a second payment to a supplier but the account details have changed
    • the sender requests an urgent payment or pressures you into providing your details
    • the email contains bad grammar, spelling or is poorly written
    • hovering over the sender’s name reveals a random address
    • there are suspicious links or attachments within the email.
    • you are asked to send a second payment to a supplier but the account details have changed
    • the sender requests an urgent payment or pressures you into providing your details
    • the email contains bad grammar, spelling or is poorly written
    • hovering over the sender’s name reveals a random address
    • there are suspicious links or attachments within the email.
  • How to stay safe


    • check the sender’s website is secure ­– the web address should start with HTTPS with a padlock on the left of the browser
    • speak to a named contact at the start of the process and don’t hesitate to phone them if you have concerns
    • if you are asked to pay money to a new account, verify it by speaking to a person whose voice you recognise
    • if a large sum is involved it is a good idea to send £1 first and check it has arrived before transferring the full amount. 
    • check the sender’s website is secure ­– the web address should start with HTTPS with a padlock on the left of the browser
    • speak to a named contact at the start of the process and don’t hesitate to phone them if you have concerns
    • if you are asked to pay money to a new account, verify it by speaking to a person whose voice you recognise
    • if a large sum is involved it is a good idea to send £1 first and check it has arrived before transferring the full amount. 

Worried that you've been targeted?

If you think you've been the victim of any scam, it's important to call us as soon as possible.

Call 03 456 100 100 (Lines are open 24/7, 365 days a year).